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‘Control is a series of furniture joints that can be used to help aid the making process for design enthusiast and DIY hackers who want to build their own furniture. The joints fit planed timber (34x34mm) that can be purchased from any good D.I.Y. store or timber merchant. Easily constructed with just a hammer, hand saw and drill, furniture can be manufactured from the most humble of tool kits. The joints work by pushing the timber into the slots, drilling two 4mm holes and then hammering in 40mm (in length) dowel pints that can also be purchased from any D.I.Y. shop.
The joints can be downloaded from the web for free (from http://www.thingiverse.com/jack_rupt/designs) so the user can 3D print them. The recommended print materials are Nylon plastic, acrylic based polymer or metal. Users who intend to print the joints are also encouraged to edit and the joints and appropriate them to any purpose. Alternatively, interested individuals can contact me directly for joints that are machine made.

The joints have been used to design a small collection of furniture including a bench, chair and coffee table that have each been individually customised by myself. The planed timber on the bench has been laser etched with an intricate paisley pattern that will soon become available to download for free, along with other designs.

The aesthetics of the collection derive from using ideational drawing to create a new thinking/designing space. I started off by drawing a collection of abstract furniture components that were influenced by my research (most notably the golden ratio and the Russian constructionist movement from the 1920’s)). I then drew a collection of furniture components that I know could be easily made using the machinary I had at my disposal, a 3 axis CNC Router. By merging the two sets of drawing I established a new thinking/drawing space that helped me to create a refined series of chair and table components that were original, different to my past works but still recognisable as my work, historically aesthetically informed and able to be manufactured using tools readily available to myself.

I did extensive research into how both ownership and authorship is perceived in creative industries. I decided to take inspiration from Ronan Barthes Death of the Author paper that argues that the reader of a fictional book is the real author, as it is their interpretation of the book that matters. By applying this theory to my work I am effectively treating the joints (and soon to be patterns) as tools for another designers imagination.’